Lead at Home

Our closest relationships may be the ones where we can have the greatest impact, and where our input is needed the most. But these can be the hardest conversations to start. Here are a few tips and resources for starting these critically important conversations, and organizations that can help.

Leading by example

  1. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation, and always have a plan
  2. Don’t condone irresponsible consumption of alcohol among friends or family
  3. Always be a responsible host, serving a full meal, and non-alcoholic alternatives
  4. Be conscious of the influence your alcohol consumption has on young people
  5. Keep alcohol monitored, and out of reach of children
  6. Seek to help those who struggle with consuming alcohol responsibly, and honor the decision of those who choose not to drink
  7. Model alternatives to consuming alcohol

Talking to children about Alcohol

  1. It’s never too soon to start talking with your kids about alcohol
  2. Understand the attitudes of young people about alcohol
  3. Be open and honest
  4. Explain the facts and confront misperceptions about alcohol
  5. Listen to what they have to say
  6. Discuss alternative activities to drinking
Resources for talking with your children about alcohol
  1. Australia

    How to be a strong role model, and information for talking with your kids about alcohol

    Read more >>

  2. United Kingdom

    Information for parents about how and why to talk with your kids about alcohol

    Read more >>

  1. United States

    PSA: How to Talk With Your Kids About Drinking in College

    Read more >>

  2. United States

    When and how to discuss alcohol with your kids

    Read more >>

  3. United States

    Responsibility starts with me

    Read more >>

  1. United States

    Make a Difference: Talk to your child about alcohol

    Read more >>

  2. Spain

    Minors Not a Drop: Tools for communication between parents and children

    Read more >>

Tips for starting a tough conversation with a loved one

  1. Find a quiet time when you can be alone, when you won’t be interrupted or need to rush anywhere
  2. Stay calm, positive and open to whatever is being said
  3. Underscore that you’re having this conversation because you care, and you’re there for support
  4. Ask questions, persuade the individual to get help, offer to go with them

If you or someone you know needs help with a drinking problem, there are many organizations that can help

Rehab International

Rehab International

Alcohol Rehab Guide

Alcohol Rehab Guide

Al-Anon Family Groups

Al-Anon Family Groups

Industry Wide Council for Alcohol Consumption

Industry Wide Council for Alcohol Consumption

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

http://www.aa.org

 

*Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. has not approved, endorsed, or reviewed this website, nor is it affiliated with it, and the ability to link to A.A.’s site does not imply otherwise.